Engage your learners with Kahoot.

This week I’ve been getting excited about using Kahoot in the classroom. Kahoot delivers online quizzes and surveys to your students.

imageIt works very similar to the more well-known Socrative. The teacher displays the question and the answers on the beamer or tv in the front of the classroom. The students see the corresponding icon and color on their screen. They have 30 seconds to answer on their devices and get points for every question they answer right. The quicker they answer the more points they receive. After each question the top 5 students are shown on the board with their scores. This is where it gets exciting. The students love this immediate feedback and want to get to the top position. I have never seen students so focused on answering the questions correctly.

The quizzes are really easy to make so over the past two weeks I have used Kahoot about 10 times in different classes. What I found striking was that almost every time the scoreboard was topped by students who are usually quite shy and wouldn’t raise their hands in the lessons to answer the questions. It’s nice to see these students being appreciated and cheered on by the rest of the class when they come out as the winner with their names big across the screen at the end of the quiz.

At the end of the quiz you can download a spreadsheet report of how all of the students did for each question.

All in all I am definitely adding Kahoot to my must-have iPad class tools in my Professional Development classes.

Positives. 

  • Gamification. Students are truly motivated to get high up on the leaderboard.
  • Very lightweight. I haven’t experienced any crashes or time-out errors where I normally would have done with Socrative or Nearpod.
  • Game advances immediately when 30 seconds are over or when all students have answered. This makes the process much more efficient than with similar apps.
  • A big annoyance when doing these types of quizzes is that students can think of their own usernames and often think of silly or rude ones. Before you start you can kick these students out of the game and they need to re-enter with a name you do approve of.
  • As you wait for students to enter the pincode, you can play a youtube video in the background. This could just be a funny video or something related to the quiz.
  • Works in the browser on all platforms. No need to install an app first.
  • Many quizzes or public so you can find quizzes made by others or easily share yours with a colleague.
  • At the end of the quiz students can give you feedback on how much they enjoyed the quiz. This can come in handy when you want to use someone else’s quiz.
  • It’s free

Negatives. 

  • Only works with multiple choice questions.
  • There is only one possible correct answer.
  • Because of the game element the quizzes are live and every participant needs to be in the same room. As of yet there is no option yet for remote quizzes whereby you can let students do the quiz as homework.
  • There is a maximum of 95 characters for the question and 60 characters for the answers. (I have gone around this by typing out the question in another app taking a screenshot of it and uploading the question as an image.)

 

Kahoot has a video up on their website of how students react to doing the quizzes.
The same happened in my class every single time.

 

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Posted in Apps we use, Blog

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